• Heel Fissures

    There are many potential causes of "cracked heels." Dry skin (xerosis) is common and can get worse with wearing open-back shoes, increased weight, or increased friction from the back of shoes. Dry cracking skin can also be a subtle sign of more significant problems, such as diabetes or loss of nerve

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  • P.A.D. (Peripheral Arterial Disease)

    What is Peripheral Arterial Disease? Commonly referred to as “poor circulation,” Peripheral Arterial Disease (P.A.D.) is the restriction of blood flow in the arteries of the leg. When arteries become narrowed by plaque (the accumulation of cholesterol and other materials on the walls of the arteries),

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  • Os Trigonum Syndrome

    What is the Os Trigonum?  The os trigonum is an extra (accessory) bone that sometimes develops behind the ankle bone (talus). It is connected to the talus by a fibrous band. The presence of an os trigonum in one or both feet is congenital (present at birth). It becomes evident during adolescence when

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  • Heel Bone Fractures

    What is the Calcaneus?  The calcaneus, also called the heel bone, is a large bone that forms the foundation of the rear part of the foot. The calcaneus connects with the talus and cuboid bones. The connection between the talus and calcaneus forms the subtalar joint. This joint is important for normal

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  • Heel Cracks

    There are many potential causes of "cracked heels." Dry skin (xerosis) is common and can get worse with wearing open-back shoes, increased weight, or increased friction from the back of shoes. Dry cracking skin can also be a subtle sign of more significant problems, such as diabetes or loss of nerve

    Read more
  • Lacrosse Injuries to the Foot and Ankle

    The running and side to side cutting in lacrosse are common causes of injuries to the foot and ankle. Lacrosse players should be aware of the following risks:  Inversion ankle sprains can damage the ankle ligaments, and can also be associated with peroneal tendon injuries and fractures.  Ankle

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  • Pediatric Flatfoot

    What Is Pediatric Flatfoot? Flatfoot is common in both children and adults. When this deformity occurs in children, it is referred to as “pediatric flatfoot.” Although there are various forms of flatfoot, they all share one characteristic – partial or total collapse of the arch.   Pediatric

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  • Ingrown Toenails

    What Is an Ingrown Toenail? When a toenail is ingrown, it is curved and grows into the skin, usually at the nail borders (the sides of the nail). This “digging in” of the nail irritates the skin, often creating pain, redness, swelling, and warmth in the toe.   If an ingrown nail causes a break

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  • Lisfranc Injuries

    The Lisfranc Joint The Lisfranc joint is the point at which the metatarsal bones (long bones that lead up to the toes) and the tarsal bones (bones in the arch) connect. The Lisfranc ligament is a tough band of tissue that joins two of these bones. This is important for maintaining proper alignment and

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  • Orthotics

    Custom orthotics are medical devices prescribed by a foot and ankle surgeon. These shoe inserts, which support and align the foot and lower extremities, are formed by making a plaster mold of the foot. Additional valuable information: Pedatric Flatfoot Heel Pain PTTD Flexible Flatfoot

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  • Peripheral Arterial Disease (P.A.D.)

    What is Peripheral Arterial Disease? Commonly referred to as “poor circulation,” Peripheral Arterial Disease (P.A.D.) is the restriction of blood flow in the arteries of the leg. When arteries become narrowed by plaque (the accumulation of cholesterol and other materials on the walls of the arteries),

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  • Joint Swelling in the Foot

    The foot contains 26 bones and more than 30 joints. The body’s natural response to any type of joint injury is to increase blood flow to the affected area. This results in an accumulation of fluid in the tissues in and around the joint, resulting in swelling. Depending on the cause of the injury, joint

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  • Osteoporosis

    Osteoporosis, which means “porous bone,” is a condition in which bones become weak and thin due to lack of calcium. People with osteoporosis have an increased risk of bone fractures (breaks).  Osteoporosis is often called the “silent disease” because many people do not realize they have it.

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  • Plantar Fibroma

    What is the Plantar Fibroma?  A plantar fibroma is a fibrous knot (nodule) in the arch of the foot. It is embedded within the plantar fascia, a band of tissue that extends from the heel to the toes on the bottom of the foot. A plantar fibroma can develop in one or both feet, is benign (non-malignant),

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  • Puncture Wounds

    What Is a Puncture Wound? Puncture wounds are not the same as cuts. A puncture wound has a small entry hole caused by a pointed object, such as a nail that you’ve stepped on. In contrast, a cut is an open wound that produces a long tear in the skin. Puncture wounds require different treatment from

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  • Jones Fracture

    What is a Fifth Metatarsal Fracture? Fractures (breaks) are common in the fifth metatarsal – the long bone on the outside of the foot that connects to the little toe. Two types of fractures that often occur in the fifth metatarsal are:   Avulsion fracture. In an avulsion fracture, a small

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Contact Us

Dakota Foot & Ankle Clinic

Monday:

8:30 am-4:30 pm

Tuesday:

8:30 am-4:30 pm

Wednesday:

8:30 am-4:30 pm

Thursday:

8:30 am-4:30 pm

Friday:

8:30 am-4:30 pm

Saturday:

Closed

Sunday:

Closed